Fracking in California
In the last decade, oil companies have turned their attention to the Monterey Shale formation and are using fracking and other increasingly extreme measures to access California's remaining oil and gas reserves.   Read more.
Technology
In order to extract California's remaining fossil fuel reserves, the oil industry is experimenting with a number of new techniques that rely on proppants, corrosive acids and other potentially lethal chemicals.   Read more.
Health
Fracking uses hundreds of chemicals, including endocrine disrupters and hydrofluoric acid, many of which can have serious negative health effects, including infertility, birth defects and cancer.   Read more.
Safety
Accidents that occur during the transport of crude oil and the dangerous chemicals used in fracking are just one of many threats to the safety of workers and nearby communities.   Read more.
Economy
Recent analysis of oil industry data reveals that projections of oil production in the Monterey Shale formation are highly overstated. The data raises questions about whether increased oil production will create jobs or help California's economy.   Read more.
Water
California oil fields generate far more wastewater than oil and gas. This wastewater can be dangerous, as it often contains toxins, high salt content and traces of radioactive material.   Read more.
Seismology
There is extensive research showing that the injection of large volumes of fluid deep into the earth the can destabilize fault lines and trigger man-made earthquakes.   Read more.
Climate
California's remaining oil reserves contain some of the heaviest, most carbon intensive oil on the planet. Producing and refining this oil is expected to dramatically increase California's carbon emissions.   Read more.
Food
The Monterey Shale formation lies directly beneath some of California's most productive farmland and critical water sources. Extracting oil from this formation carries serious risks for soil and water contamination.   Read more.

Fracking Press Clips: September 2, 2015

Today’s Top Story: 

  • According to the Bakersfield Californian’s Lois Henry, another Kern County water district will begin taking oilfield produced water to irrigate crops. The North Kern Water Storage District will begin accepting about 32 acre feet a day of produced water from California Resources Corp.’s Kern Front Field into its Lerdo Canal as early as this week. (Bakersfield Californian)

California News

Residents pack Pismo Beach council meeting to oppose Phillips 66 rail project
San Louis Obispo
People lined the walls of the Pismo Beach City Council chambers Tuesday night in advance of a presentation about a proposed Phillips 66 Co. rail project that would bring up to 250 trains carrying crude oil through the county each year.

Opinion/Blog/Press Release

LOIS HENRY: More oilfield water to irrigate Kern crops
Bakersfield Californian
Another local agricultural water district will begin taking oilfield produced water to irrigate crops perhaps starting as early as this week (if all goes as planned).

35k Pledge to Stop Buying Produce From Popular CA Produce Companies After Report Finds Companies Likely Using Fracking Wastewater
Courage Campaign
More than 35,600 people, members of the California-based Courage Campaign, have pledged to stop buying produce from popular California produce companies – including Sunview, Halos Mandarins, Trinchero, and Bee Sweet Citrus – after a Mother Jones article revealed that they may be growing their fruit using oil industry wastewater, laced with toxic compounds.

Analysis: 1 Million California Students Attend School in 1-Mile Impact Zone for Derailing Oil Trains
Center for Biological Diversity
More than 1 million California children attend school within a one-mile evacuation zone of railroads used by oil trains, according to a new analysis by the Center for Biological Diversity. Oil trains have experienced a dramatic increase in explosions and derailments across the country in recent years.

National News

Texas regulator says oil and gas companies not causing earthquakes
Associated Press
The regulatory agency overseeing Texas’ oil and gas industry has determined that a series of small earthquakes in North Texas likely wasn’t caused by drilling operations by an Exxon Mobil subsidiary.

SMU researchers fail to appear at earthquake hearing
WFAA
Earthquakes in North Texas: Who — or what — is at fault?

Oil & Gas Industry Looks To New Tech To Guard Workers Against Silica
KUNC
Sand is a key ingredient in hydraulic fracturing, but breathing in too much of it can lead to silicosis, an incurable but entirely preventable disease caused by sand particles or respirable crystalline silica.

Public Workshop for DOGGR's Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program.

The Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (Division) will be conducting workshops for the purpose of receiving public input on the development of updates to the regulations implementing the Division’s Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program. Read more.

Public Workshops for DOGGR's Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program

The Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (Division) will be conducting workshops for the purpose of receiving public input on the development of updates to the regulations implementing the Division’s Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program. Read more.

Webinar: Understanding the CCST Report

The Center for Environmental Health (CEH), the Alliance of Nurses for Healthy Environments (ANHE), and the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) are hosting a webinar on the CCST Report on Health & Fracking in California to help the general public better understand this report and its key findings. Read more.

Public Workshop for DOGGR's Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program

The Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (Division) will be conducting workshops for the purpose of receiving public input on the development of updates to the regulations implementing the Division’s Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program. Read more.