Fracking in California
In the last decade, oil companies have turned their attention to the Monterey Shale formation and are using fracking and other increasingly extreme measures to access California's remaining oil and gas reserves.   Read more.
Technology
In order to extract California's remaining fossil fuel reserves, the oil industry is experimenting with a number of new techniques that rely on proppants, corrosive acids and other potentially lethal chemicals.   Read more.
Health
Fracking uses hundreds of chemicals, including endocrine disrupters and hydrofluoric acid, many of which can have serious negative health effects, including infertility, birth defects and cancer.   Read more.
Safety
Accidents that occur during the transport of crude oil and the dangerous chemicals used in fracking are just one of many threats to the safety of workers and nearby communities.   Read more.
Economy
Recent analysis of oil industry data reveals that projections of oil production in the Monterey Shale formation are highly overstated. The data raises questions about whether increased oil production will create jobs or help California's economy.   Read more.
Water
California oil fields generate far more wastewater than oil and gas. This wastewater can be dangerous, as it often contains toxins, high salt content and traces of radioactive material.   Read more.
Seismology
There is extensive research showing that the injection of large volumes of fluid deep into the earth the can destabilize fault lines and trigger man-made earthquakes.   Read more.
Climate
California's remaining oil reserves contain some of the heaviest, most carbon intensive oil on the planet. Producing and refining this oil is expected to dramatically increase California's carbon emissions.   Read more.
Food
The Monterey Shale formation lies directly beneath some of California's most productive farmland and critical water sources. Extracting oil from this formation carries serious risks for soil and water contamination.   Read more.

Fracking Press Clips: July 27, 2016

TOP STORY

  • A political committee funded by oil companies has launched ads on the Internet attacking state Sen. Connie Leyva for opposing the reelection of Assemblywoman Cheryl Brown, a fellow Democrat, and questioning Levya’s party loyalty. The advertisements on YouTube are the latest episode in a skirmish that has divided Democrats in the state over Brown, a moderate who helped stall a provision of last year’s climate change bill that would have cut petroleum use significantly in California. The ads, put up without coordination with Brown’s campaign, were paid for by the Coalition to Restore California’s Middle Class, which is funded by energy companies including Chevron Corp., Valero Energy Corp. and Tesoro Corp. (Los Angeles Times)



    CALIFORNIA
     

    Energy funded PAC accused of inserting ‘racially divisive’ ad into state San Bernardino Assembly race
    Los Angeles Times | Patrick McGreevy

    A political committee funded by oil companies has launched ads on the Internet attacking state Sen. Connie Leyva of Chino for opposing the reelection of Assemblywoman Cheryl Brown of San Bernardino, a fellow Democrat, and questioning Levya’s party loyalty. A spokesman for Leyva shot back that the ads are “racially divisive” and “reprehensible.” The advertisements on YouTube are the latest episode in a skirmish that has divided Democrats in the state over Brown, a moderate who helped stall a provision of last year’s climate change bill that would have cut petroleum use significantly in California.


    NATIONAL

    Petitioners seek more disclosure on fracking chemicals
    Associated Press | Matthew Brown

    Landowners, environmentalists and public health workers petitioned Montana regulators on Tuesday to require companies to more fully divulge which “fracking” chemicals they use to produce oil and gas. A 2011 state rule allows companies to conceal chemicals they consider to be trade secrets. Officials can request the full ingredients list in the event of a spill or release of the fluids. Critics say the trade secrets exception represents an unlawful loophole, violating the public’s right to know about chemicals that can contaminate groundwater and pollute the air.

    Fracking Operations Leave Many Pennsylvania Residents Worried About Water Quality
    WBUR | Maryam Jameel

    [Audio] A draft report last year from the Environmental Protection Agency said the drinking water contamination related to hydraulic fracturing was not widespread or systemic. But, Pennsylvania residents who live near drilling operations have filed thousands of complaints, and sometimes waited for years for answers about the quality of their water.

    Coast Guard reports 4,200-gallon crude oil spill in Barataria Bay
    The Times-Picayune | Mark Schleifstein

    A Hilcorp Energy pipeline is the source of a spill of 4,200 gallons of crude oil near Lake Grande Ecaille, part of Barataria Bay and about 8 miles west of Empire, the U.S. Coast Guard reported. Officials with Houston-based Hilcorp told the Coast Guard the abandoned flow line was secured Monday after the spill was discovered. On Tuesday, the company issued a statement saying that the leak occurred in an abandoned flow line in the Lake Washington oil field in Plaquemines Parish. “The leak was immediately stopped and the spill has been contained,” the statement said. “At this point, we are estimating the release to be between 30 to 100 barrels of oil.”

    US environmentalists take aim at second TransCanada pipeline
    The Guardian

    Environmentalists are again taking aim at the company that proposed the Keystone XL pipeline this time for another of its projects they fear would send hundreds of supertankers laden with crude oil down the Atlantic coast to refineries in Texas and Louisiana. The Natural Resources Defense Council, Sierra Club and other environmental groups are concerned about potential spills of tar sands diluted bitumen along the route in Canada that goes over thousands of rivers, streams and lakes. They also warned a spill along the east coast could prove devastating to communities that depend on tourism and fisheries and are not prepared to handle an event of this kind.