Fracking in California
In the last decade, oil companies have turned their attention to the Monterey Shale formation and are using fracking and other increasingly extreme measures to access California's remaining oil and gas reserves.   Read more.
Technology
In order to extract California's remaining fossil fuel reserves, the oil industry is experimenting with a number of new techniques that rely on proppants, corrosive acids and other potentially lethal chemicals.   Read more.
Health
Fracking uses hundreds of chemicals, including endocrine disrupters and hydrofluoric acid, many of which can have serious negative health effects, including infertility, birth defects and cancer.   Read more.
Safety
Accidents that occur during the transport of crude oil and the dangerous chemicals used in fracking are just one of many threats to the safety of workers and nearby communities.   Read more.
Economy
Recent analysis of oil industry data reveals that projections of oil production in the Monterey Shale formation are highly overstated. The data raises questions about whether increased oil production will create jobs or help California's economy.   Read more.
Water
California oil fields generate far more wastewater than oil and gas. This wastewater can be dangerous, as it often contains toxins, high salt content and traces of radioactive material.   Read more.
Seismology
There is extensive research showing that the injection of large volumes of fluid deep into the earth the can destabilize fault lines and trigger man-made earthquakes.   Read more.
Climate
California's remaining oil reserves contain some of the heaviest, most carbon intensive oil on the planet. Producing and refining this oil is expected to dramatically increase California's carbon emissions.   Read more.
Food
The Monterey Shale formation lies directly beneath some of California's most productive farmland and critical water sources. Extracting oil from this formation carries serious risks for soil and water contamination.   Read more.

Fracking Press Clips: Februray 11, 2016

Today’s Top Story:  

  • Gov. Jerry Brown is looking to make good on a promise to curb California’s petroleum use by shifting away from new legislation and instead tucking his fuel-reduction goal inside the state budget. The budget the governor submitted to the Legislature last month proposed spending a third of the state’s cap-and-trade funds, about $1 billion, on public transit, promoting electric vehicles and other programs, all with the explicit goal of cutting oil use by 50% by 2030. Those dollars were collected through the auction of pollution credits to companies that emit greenhouse gases. (Los Angeles Times)

California

Gov. Jerry Brown makes budget the latest battleground on climate change
Los Angeles Times
Gov. Jerry Brown is looking to make good on a promise to curb California’s petroleum use by shifting away from new legislation and instead tucking his fuel-reduction goal inside the state budget. The budget the governor submitted to the Legislature last month proposed spending a third of the state’s cap-and-trade funds, about $1 billion, on public transit, promoting electric vehicles and other programs, all with the explicit goal of cutting oil use by 50% by 2030. Those dollars were collected through the auction of pollution credits to companies that emit greenhouse gases.

California’s New Methane Rules Would Be the Nation’s Strongest
Inside Climate News
California proposed new regulations to curb methane from the oil and gas industry last week, adding momentum to a state and federal push to reduce emissions of the powerful greenhouse gas. If enacted, California’s rules would be the strongest in the country, outpacing similar efforts from the Obama administration and several other states.

Campaign to protect big oil has strange roots, twisted logic.
Monterey County Now
Two commercials set to air at the end of this month,  for Monterey County for Energy Independence, an offshoot of Californians for Energy Independence, funded by big oil, have unclear intentions.

Opinion & Press Release

Hundreds Urge Planning Commission to Deny Phillips 66’s Dangerous Oil Train Proposal
The Huffington Post
On February 4th and 5th, hundreds of people from across California converged on downtown San Luis Obispo to urge county planning commissioners to reject Phillips 66’s proposal to build an oil train terminal at its Santa Maria refinery. The oil giant seeks to transport tar sands crude from Canada in mile-long trains — each laden with over two million gallons of dirty crude — that would travel through hundreds of communities before arriving at the refinery on California’s Central Coast.

Bill Introduced to Protect Groundwater Quality
Office of Assemblymember Das Williams
Assemblymember Das Williams (D – Carpinteria) introduced Assembly Bill 1882. The bill requires the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) to protect groundwater resources through close review of underground injection control projects, ensuring that groundwater is safe for drinking and irrigation.

8 Things California Gov. Brown Doesn’t Want You to Know
EcoWatch
The governor of California, Jerry Brown, loves to talk a big game about climate change. We applaud him for that. Unfortunately, his half measures are in fact the most any governor has done on climate in the U.S. But just because we’re getting something, doesn’t mean we shouldn’t hold him accountable for his poor decisions on fracking, urban drilling and regulatory oversight.

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