Fracking in California
In the last decade, oil companies have turned their attention to the Monterey Shale formation and are using fracking and other increasingly extreme measures to access California's remaining oil and gas reserves.   Read more.
Technology
In order to extract California's remaining fossil fuel reserves, the oil industry is experimenting with a number of new techniques that rely on proppants, corrosive acids and other potentially lethal chemicals.   Read more.
Health
Fracking uses hundreds of chemicals, including endocrine disrupters and hydrofluoric acid, many of which can have serious negative health effects, including infertility, birth defects and cancer.   Read more.
Safety
Accidents that occur during the transport of crude oil and the dangerous chemicals used in fracking are just one of many threats to the safety of workers and nearby communities.   Read more.
Economy
Recent analysis of oil industry data reveals that projections of oil production in the Monterey Shale formation are highly overstated. The data raises questions about whether increased oil production will create jobs or help California's economy.   Read more.
Water
California oil fields generate far more wastewater than oil and gas. This wastewater can be dangerous, as it often contains toxins, high salt content and traces of radioactive material.   Read more.
Seismology
There is extensive research showing that the injection of large volumes of fluid deep into the earth the can destabilize fault lines and trigger man-made earthquakes.   Read more.
Climate
California's remaining oil reserves contain some of the heaviest, most carbon intensive oil on the planet. Producing and refining this oil is expected to dramatically increase California's carbon emissions.   Read more.
Food
The Monterey Shale formation lies directly beneath some of California's most productive farmland and critical water sources. Extracting oil from this formation carries serious risks for soil and water contamination.   Read more.

Fracking Press Clips: May 27, 2016

Today’s Top Stories:

The federal government today may release a final environmental impact report for fracking off the coast of Santa Barbara, potentially setting up an end to a 4-month moratorium, a source tells ME. BOEM and BSEE published a draft report in March that said fracking would only have short-term effects on the environment, and that the risk of a spill was small. Both the assessment and the moratorium stem from a settlement with the Center for Biological diversity that was struck in February (Politico Morning Energy)


California

Frack On or Frack Off Coastal California
Politico Morning Energy 

The federal government today may release a final environmental impact report for fracking off the coast of Santa Barbara, potentially setting up an end to a 4-month moratorium, a source tells ME. BOEM and BSEE published a draft report in March that said fracking would only have short-term effects on the environment, and that the risk of a spill was small. Both the assessment and the moratorium stem from a settlement with the Center for Biological diversity that was struck in February.

Shell Pipeline Leaks 20,000 Gallons of Oil in California’s Central Valley
EcoWatch 

For the second time in two weeks, Shell has spilled thousands of gallons of oil, this time in California’s Central Valley. Less than two weeks after dumping nearly 90,000 gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, Shell Oil is at it again. The company’s San Pablo Bay Pipeline, which transports crude oil from California’s Central Valley to the San Francisco Bay Area, leaked an estimated 21,000 gallons into the soil near in San Joaquin County this week.


National

Oil prices top $50 a barrel for first time in 2016
The Washington Post 

The price of crude oil popped over $50 a barrel Thursday for the first time this year, bolstered by declines in U.S. stockpiles, gradually rising global consumption and steady declines in U.S. shale oil production. The U.S. benchmark grade of oil, West Texas Intermediate, closed the day down slightly at $49.35 a barrel, and the international benchmark Brent grade settled at $50.09 a barrel.

The World’s Largest Oil And Gas Companies 2016: Exxon Is Still King
Forbes

The past year hasn’t been kind to oil and gas companies, as sliding oil prices have eaten sharply into bottom lines and caused layoffs and bankruptcies across the industry. However, the titans of energy are still standing tall, even as their businesses are pressured. ExxonMobil XOM +0.16% remains the world’s largest oil company and No. 9 on Forbes’ Global 2000 list of the world’s biggest and most powerful public companies, as measured by a composite score of revenues, profits, assets and market value. 

Big Oil is all over the place on climate change
Grist

Major oil companies are anything but consistent on the biggest challenge of our time. At Exxon’s annual shareholders’ meeting in Dallas on Wednesday, CEO Rex Tillerson said the company takes climate change seriously, but he also said that ending oil production is “not acceptable to humanity.”

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