Fracking in California
In the last decade, oil companies have turned their attention to the Monterey Shale formation and are using fracking and other increasingly extreme measures to access California's remaining oil and gas reserves.   Read more.
Technology
In order to extract California's remaining fossil fuel reserves, the oil industry is experimenting with a number of new techniques that rely on proppants, corrosive acids and other potentially lethal chemicals.   Read more.
Health
Fracking uses hundreds of chemicals, including endocrine disrupters and hydrofluoric acid, many of which can have serious negative health effects, including infertility, birth defects and cancer.   Read more.
Safety
Accidents that occur during the transport of crude oil and the dangerous chemicals used in fracking are just one of many threats to the safety of workers and nearby communities.   Read more.
Economy
Recent analysis of oil industry data reveals that projections of oil production in the Monterey Shale formation are highly overstated. The data raises questions about whether increased oil production will create jobs or help California's economy.   Read more.
Water
California oil fields generate far more wastewater than oil and gas. This wastewater can be dangerous, as it often contains toxins, high salt content and traces of radioactive material.   Read more.
Seismology
There is extensive research showing that the injection of large volumes of fluid deep into the earth the can destabilize fault lines and trigger man-made earthquakes.   Read more.
Climate
California's remaining oil reserves contain some of the heaviest, most carbon intensive oil on the planet. Producing and refining this oil is expected to dramatically increase California's carbon emissions.   Read more.
Food
The Monterey Shale formation lies directly beneath some of California's most productive farmland and critical water sources. Extracting oil from this formation carries serious risks for soil and water contamination.   Read more.

CA Oil & Gas Press Clips: February 16, 2017

CA Oil & Gas Press Clips
Thursday, February 16, 2017

TOP STORY

  • The oil industry is firing back at environmental groups over a decision by the federal EPA to allow deep-well injection of production waste water into three aquifers in Kern County. That decision was supported by California Governor Jerry Brown. The EPA last week announced the Fruitvale, Round Mountain, and Tejon aquifers will remain exempted from the Safe Drinking Water Act, meaning the oil producers can continue to inject their production waste water back into zones where it was pumped from. Meanwhile, Gov. Jerry Brown’s oil regulators today failed to meet their own deadline for shutting down 1,650 oil industry injection wells that are violating water-protection laws by dumping toxic fluid into protected California aquifers. (Kern Golden Empire, Center for Biological Diversity)

CALIFORNIA

Oil industry fires back at environmental groups over decision for deep-well injection
Kern Golden Empire | Jim Scott

The oil industry is firing back at environmental groups over a decision by the federal EPA to allow deep-well injection of production waste water into three aquifers in Kern County. That decision was supported by California Governor Jerry Brown. The EPA last week announced the Fruitvale, Round Mountain, and Tejon aquifers will remain exempted from the Safe Drinking Water Act, meaning the oil producers can continue to inject their production waste water back into zones where it was pumped from.

NatGas Shows Off Its Rural Side in California’s Farm Belt
Natural Gas Intelligence | Richard Nemec

Natural gas tried to energize one of the nation’s largest farm expos on Tuesday as Sempra Energy’s Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) showed off its rural side in Tulare, CA, the heart of the state’s bread basket, which coexists with the third-largest U.S. oil producing operations.

OPINION, REPORT, & PRESS RELEASE

California Shrugs Off Deadline for Shutting Down Illegal Oil Industry Injections
Center for Biological Diversity 

Gov. Jerry Brown’s oil regulators today failed to meet their own deadline for shutting down 1,650 oil industry injection wells that are violating water-protection laws by dumping toxic fluid into protected California aquifers. “Governor Brown’s administration has decided not to protect our water from illegal contamination by the oil industry,” said Hollin Kretzmann of the Center for Biological Diversity. “By failing to meet their own lax deadline for shutting down these polluting wells, state oil regulators have given Californians another reason not to trust a word they say.”

EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Inventory Makes Progress but Misses Forest for Trees

The Energy Collective 
In its draft 2017 GHG inventory, published this week, the EPA estimates methane emissions from the oil and gas industry were lower than their previous estimate in the 2016 inventory. The vast majority of the decrease comes from methodological changes in how EPA does these estimates and does not represent actual reductions from improved industry practices.

Photo Project Portrays Families Impacted by Fracking and Fighting Back
Huffington Post | International League of Conservation Photographers

Hydraulic fracturing has transformed the American landscape over the last decade, triggering booms in oil and natural gas production, making a few people wealthy – but also inflicting a terrible toll on many rural families and public health.

NATIONAL

New CU study looks at impact of nearby oil and gas drilling on childhood cancer rates
The Denver Post | John Ingold

A new study from University of Colorado researchers finds a possible link between a specific kind of childhood cancer and nearby oil and gas activity, but the state Health Department and others are challenging the conclusion.

Fracking Rule Text Disappears From Interior Department Website
EcoWatch | Alleen Brown

In Donald Trump’s first week as president, text describing two rules regulating the oil and gas industry was removed from an Interior Department website. The rules, limiting hydraulic fracturing and natural gas flaring on public lands, are in the crosshairs of the Trump administration. The changes were noted by the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative or EDGI, which has been monitoring changes to federal web sites since Trump’s inauguration.