Fracking in California
In the last decade, oil companies have turned their attention to the Monterey Shale formation and are using fracking and other increasingly extreme measures to access California's remaining oil and gas reserves.   Read more.
Technology
In order to extract California's remaining fossil fuel reserves, the oil industry is experimenting with a number of new techniques that rely on proppants, corrosive acids and other potentially lethal chemicals.   Read more.
Health
Fracking uses hundreds of chemicals, including endocrine disrupters and hydrofluoric acid, many of which can have serious negative health effects, including infertility, birth defects and cancer.   Read more.
Safety
Accidents that occur during the transport of crude oil and the dangerous chemicals used in fracking are just one of many threats to the safety of workers and nearby communities.   Read more.
Economy
Recent analysis of oil industry data reveals that projections of oil production in the Monterey Shale formation are highly overstated. The data raises questions about whether increased oil production will create jobs or help California's economy.   Read more.
Water
California oil fields generate far more wastewater than oil and gas. This wastewater can be dangerous, as it often contains toxins, high salt content and traces of radioactive material.   Read more.
Seismology
There is extensive research showing that the injection of large volumes of fluid deep into the earth the can destabilize fault lines and trigger man-made earthquakes.   Read more.
Climate
California's remaining oil reserves contain some of the heaviest, most carbon intensive oil on the planet. Producing and refining this oil is expected to dramatically increase California's carbon emissions.   Read more.
Food
The Monterey Shale formation lies directly beneath some of California's most productive farmland and critical water sources. Extracting oil from this formation carries serious risks for soil and water contamination.   Read more.

Fracking Press Clips: July 27, 2015

Today’s Top Story: 

  • To prevent the worst effects of global warming, one-third of the world’s known oil reserves must remain in the ground, Governor Jerry Brown told a gathering of government officials from around the world at the Vatican last week. However, he has shown no interest in slowing the state’s oil production as he touts the vast potential of the Monterey Shale and refuses requests for bans on fracking. (San Francisco Chronicle)

California News

Gov. Brown wants to keep oil in the ground. But whose oil?
San Francisco Chronicle
To prevent the worst effects of global warming, one-third of the world’s known oil reserves must remain in the ground, Brown told the gathering of government officials from around the world. The same goes for 50 percent of natural gas reserves and 90 percent of coal.

INSIDE FRACKING: Chevron offers rare look at controversial practice
The Bakersfield Californian
Chevron invited a Californian reporter and photographer to witness a fracking operation in Kern County because, spokeswoman Carla Musser said, “I think we have a responsibility in today’s times to educate as much as we can.”

Chevron selling treated water to Cawelo Water District
KERO
As this historic drought continues nearly every source of water continues to be used and some cases re-evaluated. Chevron has been selling treated water to the Cawelo Water District since 1994 but recently the quality of that water has been brought into question.

Supervisors to hold special meeting on drought, oil emergency re-ratification
Lompoc Record
The Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors will hold a special meeting Tuesday to re-ratify local emergency and drought proclamations.The purpose of re-ratifying the respective proclamations is to ensure the county remains eligible for federal funding related to the drought, and oil spill cleanup efforts at Refugio State Beach.

Is your food being grown with wastewater from the oil industry?
Grist
Under a 20-year-old water recycling program, wastewater that is generated as a byproduct from oil extraction is treated and sold to some 90 Southern California landowners — including one with certified organic operations — which use it to grow crops such as citrus, almonds, apples, peaches, grapes, and blueberries sold in major grocery chains around the country.

Opinion/Blog/Press Release

Carson Planning Commission must restrict fracking: Guest commentary
Daily Breeze
The health and well-being of Carson residents will be in the hands of the Carson Planning Commission on Tuesday, when commissioners vote on a long-awaited fracking ban and oil code update.

Oil Trains Pose Unacceptable Health and Safety Risks
Santa Barbara Independent
As a registered nurse, a member of the California Nurses Association, as well as a San Luis Obispo County resident and homeowner, I have been following Phillips 66’s attempt to win approval from the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors and Planning Commission, to build an expansive new rail spur at its refinery in Nipomo.

Local environmental activists don’t get to make federal policy
Los Angeles Times
Localities should not be able to block global trade — especially when no bona fide local issues are at stake and when the people promoting such intrusion have clear political motives.

National News

It’s no fracking fun: life on the Bakken Shale
National Observer
In a July 23 webinar, members of North Dakota’s environmental community spoke about the impacts of the second-largest fracking oil field in the United States, the Bakken Shale.

Fracking dispute heats up in the U.S.
Digital Journal
The controversial practice of fracking is at the center of a new health debate in the U.S. This is over whether the practice pose a risk of causing silicosis.

 

Carson Planning Commission Meeting

Meeting of the Carson Planning Commission. The commissioners will vote on a long-awaited fracking ban and oil code update. Read more.

Public Briefing Workshop 2: Draft EIR for Kern County

The Kern County Planning and Community Development Department will host a joint public briefing workshop with the Kern County Board of Supervisors and the Kern County Planning Commission to receive comments on the draft EIR. Read more.

Public Briefing Workshop 3: Draft EIR for Kern County

The Kern County Planning and Community Development Department will host a joint public briefing workshop with the Kern County Board of Supervisors and the Kern County Planning Commission to receive comments on the draft EIR. Read more.

Final Public Hearing for Draft EIR in Kern County

A public hearing has been scheduled with the Kern County Planning Commission to receive public comments on the draft EIR. Read more.