Fracking in California
In the last decade, oil companies have turned their attention to the Monterey Shale formation and are using fracking and other increasingly extreme measures to access California's remaining oil and gas reserves.   Read more.
Technology
In order to extract California's remaining fossil fuel reserves, the oil industry is experimenting with a number of new techniques that rely on proppants, corrosive acids and other potentially lethal chemicals.   Read more.
Health
Fracking uses hundreds of chemicals, including endocrine disrupters and hydrofluoric acid, many of which can have serious negative health effects, including infertility, birth defects and cancer.   Read more.
Safety
Accidents that occur during the transport of crude oil and the dangerous chemicals used in fracking are just one of many threats to the safety of workers and nearby communities.   Read more.
Economy
Recent analysis of oil industry data reveals that projections of oil production in the Monterey Shale formation are highly overstated. The data raises questions about whether increased oil production will create jobs or help California's economy.   Read more.
Water
California oil fields generate far more wastewater than oil and gas. This wastewater can be dangerous, as it often contains toxins, high salt content and traces of radioactive material.   Read more.
Seismology
There is extensive research showing that the injection of large volumes of fluid deep into the earth the can destabilize fault lines and trigger man-made earthquakes.   Read more.
Climate
California's remaining oil reserves contain some of the heaviest, most carbon intensive oil on the planet. Producing and refining this oil is expected to dramatically increase California's carbon emissions.   Read more.
Food
The Monterey Shale formation lies directly beneath some of California's most productive farmland and critical water sources. Extracting oil from this formation carries serious risks for soil and water contamination.   Read more.

Fracking Press Clips: August 26, 2016

TOP STORY

  • Researchers say that a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s journal Endocrinology, is the first to find a link between exposure to fracking chemicals and adverse reproductive and developmental repercussions in female mice. According to the Endocrine Society’s 2015 Scientific Statement, more than 1,300 studies have linked endocrine disrupting chemicals used in fracking to severe health conditions that include male and female reproductive disorders, obesity, diabetes, immune and thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, Parkinson’s disease, hormone-related cancers, and neurological disorders. (Medical News Today)


CALIFORNIA
 

California’s Emissions Goal Is a ‘Milestone’ on Climate Efforts
The New York Times | Jennifer Medina and Matt Richtel

California will extend its landmark climate change legislation to 2030, a move that climate specialists say solidifies the state’s role as a leader in the effort to curb heat-trapping emissions. Lawmakers have passed, and Gov. Jerry Brown has promised to sign, bills requiring the state to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions to 40 percent below 1990 levels. Though the governor had already set a similar goal in an executive order, the legislation will lock the goals into law. The ambitious plan targets both power plants and vehicle emissions.


OPINION & PRESS RELEASE

Obama administration: Yeah, fracking is actually good for the environment
Rare | Matt Purple

Fracking is a threat to the environmentalist movement because it shows you can solve the problem of premise one without resorting to the pain of premise two: that the atmosphere can be made healthier without inflicting massive sacrifice. Hence the attempted workaround that fracking causes the mass contamination of drinking water, which will happen shortly, soon, around the same time we reach that population bomb Paul Ehrlich kept trying to detonate. With America recently displacing Russia as the world’s number-one producer of oil and natural gas, fracking has galvanized our strapped workforce. But for the green movement, the economy’s and the environment’s savior is a sign of the end times.


NATIONAL

Gardner: Fracking bans pose ‘existential threat’
Washington Examiner | John Siciliano

The debate over banning fracking in Colorado presents an “existential threat” to the game-changing oil and gas drilling method that has made the U.S. a top energy producer in just a few years, Sen. Cory Gardner said Thursday. “This debate that’s taking place in Colorado right now about whether or not we should ban fracking is an existential threat that we have to kill and we have to stop,” Gardner said. “But unfortunately, it’s not just a debate that’s taking place in Colorado.”

The Evidence Of Fracking’s Health Effects Keeps Mounting
ThinkProgress | Alejandro Davila Fragoso

Fracking has over the past few years been associated with ground water pollution, spills, and earthquakes in various states. Now, a study led by John Hopkins University researchers found that fracking in Pennsylvania may be associated with migraines, fatigue, and sinusitis. The study, published Thursday, adds to a growing body of scientific work that on regular basis links the controversial extraction process with adverse effects on the environment and people. Researchers chose to evaluate migraines, fatigue, and sinus symptoms due to their high prevalence, large economic costs, and possible link to environmental risk factors like chemical toxicity, or odors. Fracking can produce air pollution, odors, noise, bright lights, and other factors known to be linked to migraines and respiratory problems.

Fracking chemicals may pose threat to fertility
Medical News Today | Hannah Nichols

Researchers say that a new study, published in the Endocrine Society’s journal Endocrinology, is the first study to find a link between exposure to fracking chemicals and adverse reproductive and developmental repercussions in female mice. Previous research has found that fracking chemicals are endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) – that is, they cause adverse health effects by interfering with hormones in the body. According to the Endocrine Society’s 2015 Scientific Statement, more than 1,300 studies have linked EDCs to severe health conditions that include male and female reproductive disorders, obesity, diabetes, immune and thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, Parkinson’s disease, hormone-related cancers, and neurological disorders.

Enviros wage war with Interior over leasing’s climate impact
E&E News | Ellen M. Gilmer

Environmental groups launched a broad assault today on federal oil and gas leasing, accusing the Obama administration of ignoring the climate impacts from leasing on hundreds of thousands of acres since early 2015. WildEarth Guardians and Physicians for Social Responsibility filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, challenging 397 leases in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. The leases collectively represent almost 380,000 acres. According to the groups, the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management issued the leases without analyzing the impacts on climate and taxpayers. They say the practice tarnishes President Obama’s legacy on climate issues.

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