California Fracking News

« Previous Next »


Fracking Press Clips: February 24, 2017

TOP STORY

  • Cap-and-trade is facing criticism from environmental groups who say that the state’s signature climate change program is failing communities like Wilmington, where the cancer rate is twice the city’s average. (NPR)

 

CALIFORNIA 

Environmental Groups Say California’s Climate Program Has Not Helped Them
NPR | Emily Guerin

In the Wilmington neighborhood of Los Angeles, residential streets dead end at oil refineries. Diesel trucks crawl through, carrying containers from nearby ports. Longtime resident Magali Sanchez Hall says the pollution from all that has taken a toll, right on the street where she lives. “The people that live here, the mother died of cancer,” she says, pointing to a modest one-story home. “The people that live here, three people died of cancer.”

Big Oil Capture of Calif. Politics Shatters the “Greenest State” Narrative
San Diego Free Press | Dan Bacher

In spite of California’s reputation as a “green leader,” Big Oil is the largest corporate lobby in the state and exerts enormous influence over the Governor’s Office, Legislature and regulatory agencies. As usual, the California Oil Lobby was the biggest spender in the 2015-16 legislative session, spending an amazing $36.1 million as of December 31, 2016.

California’s rain may shed light on new questions about what causes earthquakes
Phys.Org | Gillian Foulger, Jon Gluyas, & Miles Wilson

In recent weeks, California has experienced unusually heavy rainfall. California is also earthquake-prone, hosting the great San Andreas fault zone. If there is an unusual surge of earthquakes in the near future – allowing time for the rain to percolate deep into faults – California may well become an interesting laboratory to study possible connections between weather and earthquakes. Earthquakes are triggered by a tiny additional increment of stress added to a fault already loaded almost to breaking point. Many natural processes can provide this tiny increment of stress, including the movement of plate tectonics, a melting icecap, and even human activities. For example, injecting water into boreholes – either for waste disposal or to drive residual oil out of depleted reservoirs – is particularly likely to trigger earthquakes.

GlassPoint Hires Veteran Energy Leaders to Accelerate California Projects
BusinessWire

GlassPoint Solar, the leading supplier of solar for the oil and gas industry, today announced two new appointments to accelerate its projects in California. Tunde Deru joins GlassPoint as Director of Sales, Americas, and Jeffrey Kennedy as Senior Director of Project Finance. GlassPoint’s solar technology powers oilfield operations, reducing a field’s production costs and carbon emissions.

 

OPINION, REPORT, & PRESS RELEASE

California’s Wrecking The Western Electric Grid – Now 755 Mostly Native American Jobs Are At Risk
Forbes | Chuck DeVore

California is an energy policy bully. Using market share and political willpower, global warming-fearing Golden State politicians are reshaping the electric market far beyond their 39 million constituents to 46 million others living in 13 states, Western Canada and portions of Mexico.

 

NATIONAL

$9.5 million in penalties in platform blast, Gulf violations
Associated Press | Kevin McGill

An oil industry services company will pay $9.5 million in penalties for Gulf of Mexico safety violations and for pollution from a 2012 offshore platform fire that killed three workers. The penalties against Houston-based Wood Group PSN were announced Thursday by the U.S. Justice Department in Washington and U.S. attorneys in New Orleans and Lafayette, Louisiana, where civil and criminal cases have been playing out. The penalties followed plea agreements.

Pruitt’s Favorability Untarnished by Contentious Confirmation
Morning Consult | Jack Fitzpatrick

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt is no less popular after a heated hearing, boycotted committee vote, close final confirmation vote and heavily publicized email dump, according to Morning Consult polling. In a nationwide poll, 32 percent of respondents had a favorable opinion of Pruitt, while 25 percent had an unfavorable opinion. Despite vocal opposition to his nomination from Democrats, 44 percent of respondents either had no opinion of Pruitt or had not heard of him.

Billionaire Behind Dakota Access Pipeline ‘Underestimated’ the Power of Social Media
Bloomberg | Tim Loh

Billionaire Kelcy Warren, who faced months of protests over the Dakota Access oil pipeline, said his company followed every law and still fell into a “mess.” Warren “underestimated the power of social media” during the standoff with environmental and Native American-rights activists, he said on a call with analysts Thursday.

Kushner, Ivanka Trump Pushed to Remove Words Critical of Climate Deal From Executive Order ($)
Wall Street Journal | Amy Harder and Peter Nicholas

At the request of President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, and his wife, Ivanka Trump, language critical of a global climate deal was struck from an executive order that Mr. Trump is planning to sign soon, according to multiple people familiar with the move.

Study Links Childhood Leukemia With Living Near Oil and Gas Development
EcoWatch | Mike Gaworecki

With the rise of new technologies like fracking and horizontal drilling, oil and gas development in the U.S. has exploded over the last 15 years. As development expands, it’s also pushing ever closer into areas where people live. It’s been estimated that today more than 15 million Americans live within one mile of oil and gas development.

Fracking produces unexpected benefits for Ohio counties
The New Political | Delaney Murray

Oil and gas drilling, a long-time staple in Ohio, has become an important revenue source for not only gas companies themselves, but also for the counties that allow drilling on their land, a new industry study found. The study from two organizations, the industry trade group Ohio Oil and Gas Association and the industry-funded Energy in Depth, showed that six Ohio counties, Belmont, Carroll, Guernsey, Harrison, Monroe and Noble, saw sharp increases in their property tax revenue since 2010.

($) denotes a paid subscription is required to view this article. 

Full Article

Fracking Press Clips: February 23, 2017

TOP STORY

  • On May 17, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District will consider a proposal that would make the San Francisco Bay Area the world’s first region to place limits on oil refineries’ overall greenhouse-gas and particulate-matter emissions. (East Bay Express)

 

CALIFORNIA 

Bay Area Might Adopt World’s First Regional Oil-Refinery Emissions Caps
East Bay Express | Will Parrish

On May 17, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District will consider a proposal that would make the San Francisco Bay Area the world’s first region to place limits on oil refineries’ overall greenhouse-gas and particulate-matter emissions. This new regulation, Refinery Rule 12-16, would prevent oil corporations from making the East Bay a hub of Canadian tar-sands processing, because it would enforce a cap based on historic emissions levels at the five major Contra Costa and Solano county refineries.

Dozens Claim Aliso Canyon Still Causing Illness
CBS Los Angeles | Andrea Fujil

At a town hall Wednesday night, numerous Porter Ranch residents alleged that the nearby Aliso Canyon gas storage facility continues to make them sick, despite the fact that the methane leak has been capped. At a Porter Ranch Neighborhood Council meeting, dozens of people went up to the microphone to list their ailments.

California moves to pre-empt Trump on environment, endangered species
Politico | David Siders

Needling President Donald Trump and bracing for a rollback of Obama-era environmental protections, Democrats in the nation’s most populous state are launching a preemptive strike. California lawmakers are expected Thursday to propose legislation to fold existing federal air, water and endangered species standards into state law, sources said, enshrining pre-Trump levels of protection in California regardless of any reversal at the federal level.

 

OPINION, REPORT, & PRESS RELEASE

Injecting wastewater into California oil wells imperils drinking water
The Sacramento Bee | Keith Nakatani

The oil and gas industry has reigned supreme in California ever since the late 1800s, when holes poked in the ground produced gushers. These days, its millions of dollars lavished on elected officials dominate Sacramento, killing common-sense legislation to safeguard our communities. Meanwhile, the state has performed poorly when it comes to protecting the environment and public health from oil and gas pollution.

Orange County Firm Obtains $4.5M Verdict Against Oil Company

On June 28, 2016, a Ventura County jury awarded $4.5 million in damages to plaintiffs Craig and Ann Litch following a six-week trial. Mr. and Mrs. Litch’s negligence and loss of consortium claims arose from severe injuries Craig sustained while working as an electrician on an oil platform located off the coast of Santa Barbara, California. In October 2012, Mr. Litch was performing electrical maintenance on a de-energized offshore oil rig operated by defendant DCOR, LLC. According to Plaintiffs, even though the electrical maintenance was still ongoing, a DCOR employee activated a high-voltage powerline restoring electricity to the rig from the onshore power grid. The influx of electricity triggered an arc-flash explosion where Craig was working, resulting in severe burns to Craig’s face and extremities.

 

NATIONAL

Dakota Pipeline Protesters Torch Tents as Deadline to Leave Passes
NBC News | Cal Perry, Chiara Sottile, Corky Siemaszko

The six-month standoff near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation appeared to be coming to an end Wednesday as most of the Dakota Access pipeline protesters heeded the order to get off the federal land near the Missouri River. In a parting gesture, some of the tents and makeshift wooden housing were set ablaze before the 2 p.m. local time (3 p.m. ET) deadline to depart came and went. Then most of the remaining 300 or so pipeline opponents — down from the thousands at the height of the sometimes violent protests — began to leave.

Exxon revises down oil and gas reserves by 3.3 billion barrels
Reuters

U.S. oil major Exxon Mobil Corp has revised down its proved crude reserves by 3.3 billion barrels of oil equivalent as a result of low oil prices throughout 2016, a company filing showed on Wednesday. The de-booking includes the entire 3.5 billion barrels of bitumen reserves at the Kearl oil sands project in northern Alberta, operated by Imperial Oil, a Calgary-based company in which Exxon has a majority share.

Bill to protect gas and oil production killed by Colorado Dems
The Durango Herald | Luke Perkins

The House Democrats’ “kill committee” lived up to its name again Wednesday when a bill that would protect oil and gas development and mineral rights died on a 6-3 party-line vote. House Bill 1124, which would have required local governments that prohibit fracking or place moratoriums on oil and gas production to pay out the value of the mineral interest impacted, was an attempt to protect Coloradans’ property rights, said Rep. Perry Buck, R-Windsor, and sponsor of the bill.

Oil and Gas Wastewater Spills, including Fracking Wastewater, Alter Microbes in West Virginia Waters
Rutgers Today | Todd B. Bates

Wastewater from oil and gas operations – including fracking for shale gas – at a West Virginia site altered microbes downstream, according to a Rutgers-led study. The study, published recently in Science of the Total Environment, showed that wastewater releases, including briny water that contained petroleum and other pollutants, altered the diversity, numbers and functions of microbes.

Exxon Relents, Wipes Oil Sands Reserves From Its Books
Inside Climate News | Nicholas Kusnetz

ExxonMobil announced Wednesday that it had wiped off its books all 3.5 billion barrels of tar sands oil reserves at one of its projects in Canada. Because of recent low oil prices, the company said none of those reserves can be considered economical according to the accounting rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Fracking Is Dangerous To Your Health — Here’s Why
Forbes | Judy Stone

Fracking, or drilling for gas by hydraulic fracturing, has been associated with a growing number of health risks. Last week, I began this series looking at some of the hazardous chemicals injected into the wells to make drilling easier and cheaper, and the growing risks to our health by the GOP rushing through the approval of Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

($) denotes a paid subscription is required to view this article. 

Full Article

Fracking Press Clips: February 22, 2017

TOP STORY

  • California’s Senate leader has introduced legislation that would require the state to draw all of its electricity from renewable sources by 2045. If passed, the bill would make the nation’s largest state the second to commit to a carbon-free grid. (Inside Climate News, Los Angeles Times)

 

CALIFORNIA 

California Bill Aims for 100 Percent Renewable Energy by 2045
Inside Climate News | Nicholas Kusnetz

California’s Senate leader has introduced legislation that would require the state to draw all of its electricity from renewable sources by 2045. If passed, the bill would make the nation’s largest state the second to commit to a carbon-free grid.

California fails to meet Feb. 15 deadline for injection wells
Kallanish Energy

Environmentalists are unhappy the state of California has failed to shut down 475 injection wells used by oil and natural gas drillers to dispose of wastes as promised, Kallanish Energy reports. The state failed to meet its own self-imposed Feb. 15 deadline, according to eco-groups. “Governor Brown’s administration has decided not to protect our water from illegal contamination by the oil industry,” said Hollin Kretzmann of the Center for Biological Diversity, in a statement. “By failing to meet their own lax deadline for shutting down these polluting wells, state oil regulators have given Californians another reason not to trust a word they say.”

Lawmakers in California and Massachusetts Introduce Bills for 100% Renewable Energy
Green Tech Media

Kevin de León has promised to lead the resistance to President Trump. A new bill could make good on that promise. The California Senate leader has introduced legislation that would require the Golden State to get 100 percent of its electricity from climate-friendly energy sources by 2045. That’s a big step up from the state’s current renewable energy mandate, 50 percent by 2030 — a target that’s only been on the books for a year and a half, and that California is still a long way from meeting.

 

OPINION, REPORT, & PRESS RELEASE

How to fight climate change without Washington
Boston Globe | Editorial Board

Massachusetts was already planning for a Trump presidency way back in 2008. It just didn’t know it yet. That year, the Commonwealth and neighboring states began readying a new plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cars and trucks, which form a growing share of the state’s overall contribution to global climate change. A regional program to encourage cleaner fuels would be economically viable, the states concluded in 2011, though many details still needed to be ironed out. But the idea was shelved when the states couldn’t all get on the same page. Now it’s time to dust off that study.

Carbon Natural Gas Company Announces Formation of Carbon California Company, LLC and Acquisition of Oil Producing Assets and Related Financing
BusinessWire

On February 15, 2017, Carbon Natural Gas Company entered into a Limited Liability Company Agreement of Carbon California Company, LLC, established by the Company and, through Carbon California, completed a financing of $47 million and acquisition of oil and gas producing properties and related facilities located in the Ventura Basin of California for approximately $38,500,000, subject to normal and customary post-closing adjustments.

Brown should deal with California’s environmental issues
Sacramento Bee | Jamie Court

Gov. Jerry Brown may be a leading voice against Donald Trump’s anti-environmental policies, but if he really wants to trump Trump on the environment he needs to not just see the forest but also remember the trees. Brown sees the big picture of the future, be it climate change or the bullet train. On daily environmental threats to Californians, however, like bolstering Oroville Dam, Brown has fallen short.

 

NATIONAL

Looking to the States to Improve Natural Gas Storage Policies
Environmental Defense Fund | Adam Peltz

Stories about gas storage rarely make headlines, but the fact is there are hundreds of underground natural gas storage facilities peppered across the country, and when something goes wrong, the impacts can be devastating. For example, in 2015 a leak at the Aliso Canyon storage facility in Southern California ended up displacing thousands from their homes and was considered one of the biggest environmental disasters in modern U.S. history.

Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters Pray, Set Fires Ahead of Camp Closing
NBC Los Angeles | Blake Nicholson

The last people remaining at a Dakota Access pipeline protest camp prayed and set fire to a handful of wooden structures on Wednesday, hours ahead of a deadline set by the Army Corps of Engineers to close the camp. Some of the praying protesters said burning the structures — which appeared to include a yurt and a teepee — was part of the ceremony of leaving. As heavy rain turned to snow, some said they expected no trouble during the eviction, despite a heavy law enforcement presence.

Spills From Fracking Are Worse Than We Imagined
Gizmodo | George Dvorsky

An alarming new study has identified 6,600 chemical spills related to hydraulic fracturing in just four US states over a ten year period. The finding shows that fracking is far messier than previously assumed, and that stricter safety measures need to be established and enforced.

Nevada considers fracking ban
Reno Gazette-Journal | Benjamin Spillman

Nevada could become the third state in the nation to ban drilling companies from using hydraulic fracturing to get oil and natural gas from the ground. Nevada in 2014 enacted fracking regulations some say are among the most strict in the nation, but the new proposal would ban it outright. “No amount of regulation can eliminate the harmful effects on human health of fracturing,” said Assemblyman Justin Watkins, D-Las Vegas, who introduced the ban in Assembly Bill 159. “The risks far outweigh the benefits in this state.”

Thousands of emails detail EPA head’s close ties to fossil fuel industry
The Washington Post | Brady Dennis and Steven Mufson

Oklahoma has turned over thousands of pages of emails between former attorney general Scott Pruitt’s office and the energy industry, meeting a deadline set by a judge who ordered the documents’ release following more than two years of effort by an advocacy organization. The Center for Media and Democracy, which went to court to compel the state to release the emails under public records laws, said Wednesday that they offer more details about the close ties that Pruitt, now administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has long had with the oil and gas industry.

($) denotes a paid subscription is required to view this article. 

Full Article

Fracking Press Clips: February 21, 2017

TOP STORY

  • An explosion and fire erupted Saturday at a California oil refinery, exactly two years after a blast that crippled the plant and led to higher gasoline prices, authorities said. (VOA News, ABC 7, Associated Press)

 

CALIFORNIA 

Firefighters knock down blaze at California oil refinery
Associated Press

An explosion and fire erupted Saturday at a California oil refinery, exactly two years after a blast that crippled the plant and led to higher gasoline prices, authorities said. No injuries were reported from the Torrance Refining Co. near Los Angeles, and there were no evacuations or damage to any buildings outside the refinery, Assistant Fire Chief Steve Treskes said.

California Illegally Allowed Oil Companies To Inject Wastewater In Protected Waters, Audit Finds
CBS San Francisco | Christin Ayers

Hundreds of oilfield wastewater wells across California must shut down Wednesday, after a federal audit found the state illegally allowed oil companies to inject contaminated fluids into protected water supplies. But that’s not stopping the state from backing yet another oil company’s request to inject wastewater into a protected underground water source right here in the Bay Area.

 

NATIONAL

Texas Oil Fields Rebound From Price Lull, but Jobs Are Left Behind
New York Times | Clifford Krauss

In the land where oil jobs were once a guaranteed road to security for blue-collar workers, Eustasio Velazquez’s career has been upended by technology. For 10 years, he laid cables for service companies doing seismic testing in the search for the next big gusher. Then, powerful computer hardware and software replaced cables with wireless data collection, and he lost his job. He found new work connecting pipes on rigs, but lost that job, too, when plunging oil prices in 2015 forced the driller he worked for to replace rig hands with cheaper, more reliable automated tools.

Pennsylvania confirms first fracking-related earthquakes
StateImpact NPR | Reid Frazier

Pennsylvania officials say they’ve confirmed the state’s first fracking-related earthquakes took place last year in Lawrence County, northwest of Pittsburgh. As a result, the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is stepping up its requirements for drilling in that part of the state, which is known for seismic activity.

Oil industry leaves the bust behind
San Antonio Express-News | Jennifer Hiller

A year seems long ago and far away for the oil and gas industry, which enters 2017 upbeat — a mood as different from last year’s doldrums as oil and water. This time in 2016, the price of oil hit its dismal bottom of $26 per barrel as companies shed more workers and parked idle equipment in storage yards.

Study finds 6,600 spills from fracking in just four states
Phys.Org 

Each year, 2 to 16 percent of hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells spill hydrocarbons, chemical-laden water, hydraulic fracturing fluids and other substances, according to a new study.The analysis, which appears Feb. 21 in Environmental Science & Technology, identified 6,648 spills reported across Colorado, New Mexico, North Dakota and Pennsylvania during a 10-year period.

Deadline Looms for Dakota Access Pipeline Protest Camp
Associated Press | Blake Nicholson

As dawn breaks over an encampment that was once home to thousands of people protesting the Dakota Access oil pipeline, a few hundred holdouts rise for another day of resistance. They aren’t deterred by the threat of flooding, nor by declarations from state and federal authorities that they must leave by Wednesday or face possible arrest. They’re determined to remain and fight a pipeline they maintain threatens the very sanctity of the land.

Trump to roll back Obama’s climate, water rules through executive action
The Washington Post | Juliet Eilperin and Steven Mufson

President Trump is preparing executive orders aimed at curtailing Obama-era policies on climate and water pollution, according to individuals briefed on the measures. While both directives will take time to implement, they will send an unmistakable signal that the new administration is determined to promote fossil-fuel production and economic activity even when those activities collide with some environmental safeguards.

The wild west of wind’: Republicans push Texas as unlikely green energy leader
The Guardian | Tom Dart and Oliver Milman

Living in New York and Washington, Greg Wortham heard all the grand talk about green energy from liberal politicians. Then he returned to the place where he grew up, a small town that embraced wind power so warmly that within a couple of years of the first turbine turning, it had some of the biggest farms on the planet. Yet Wortham is not from California, Oregon or New England, but a deeply conservative sector of Texas on the edge of the Permian Basin, one of the most bountiful oil and gas patches in the world.

Scientists hold rally in Boston to protest threat to science
The Associated Press

Hundreds of scientists, environmental advocates and their supporters held a rally in Boston on Sunday to protest what they see as increasing threats to science and research in the U.S. The scientists, some dressed in white lab coats, called on President Donald Trump’s administration to recognize evidence of climate change and take action on various environmental issues.

Worst Gasoline Glut in 27 Years Could Be Oil Rally’s Nemesis ($)
The Wall Street Journal | Timothy Puko and Alison Sider

A gasoline glut brought on by drivers buying less at filling stations is emerging as one of the biggest threats to the yearlong oil-price rally. U.S. gasoline consumption plummeted last month, nearly matching a 15-year low, government estimates show.

($) denotes a paid subscription is required to view this article. 

Full Article

CA Oil & Gas Press Clips: February 16, 2017

CA Oil & Gas Press Clips
Thursday, February 16, 2017

TOP STORY

  • The oil industry is firing back at environmental groups over a decision by the federal EPA to allow deep-well injection of production waste water into three aquifers in Kern County. That decision was supported by California Governor Jerry Brown. The EPA last week announced the Fruitvale, Round Mountain, and Tejon aquifers will remain exempted from the Safe Drinking Water Act, meaning the oil producers can continue to inject their production waste water back into zones where it was pumped from. Meanwhile, Gov. Jerry Brown’s oil regulators today failed to meet their own deadline for shutting down 1,650 oil industry injection wells that are violating water-protection laws by dumping toxic fluid into protected California aquifers. (Kern Golden Empire, Center for Biological Diversity)

CALIFORNIA

Oil industry fires back at environmental groups over decision for deep-well injection
Kern Golden Empire | Jim Scott

The oil industry is firing back at environmental groups over a decision by the federal EPA to allow deep-well injection of production waste water into three aquifers in Kern County. That decision was supported by California Governor Jerry Brown. The EPA last week announced the Fruitvale, Round Mountain, and Tejon aquifers will remain exempted from the Safe Drinking Water Act, meaning the oil producers can continue to inject their production waste water back into zones where it was pumped from.

NatGas Shows Off Its Rural Side in California’s Farm Belt
Natural Gas Intelligence | Richard Nemec

Natural gas tried to energize one of the nation’s largest farm expos on Tuesday as Sempra Energy’s Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) showed off its rural side in Tulare, CA, the heart of the state’s bread basket, which coexists with the third-largest U.S. oil producing operations.

OPINION, REPORT, & PRESS RELEASE

California Shrugs Off Deadline for Shutting Down Illegal Oil Industry Injections
Center for Biological Diversity 

Gov. Jerry Brown’s oil regulators today failed to meet their own deadline for shutting down 1,650 oil industry injection wells that are violating water-protection laws by dumping toxic fluid into protected California aquifers. “Governor Brown’s administration has decided not to protect our water from illegal contamination by the oil industry,” said Hollin Kretzmann of the Center for Biological Diversity. “By failing to meet their own lax deadline for shutting down these polluting wells, state oil regulators have given Californians another reason not to trust a word they say.”

EPA’s Greenhouse Gas Inventory Makes Progress but Misses Forest for Trees

The Energy Collective 
In its draft 2017 GHG inventory, published this week, the EPA estimates methane emissions from the oil and gas industry were lower than their previous estimate in the 2016 inventory. The vast majority of the decrease comes from methodological changes in how EPA does these estimates and does not represent actual reductions from improved industry practices.

Photo Project Portrays Families Impacted by Fracking and Fighting Back
Huffington Post | International League of Conservation Photographers

Hydraulic fracturing has transformed the American landscape over the last decade, triggering booms in oil and natural gas production, making a few people wealthy – but also inflicting a terrible toll on many rural families and public health.

NATIONAL

New CU study looks at impact of nearby oil and gas drilling on childhood cancer rates
The Denver Post | John Ingold

A new study from University of Colorado researchers finds a possible link between a specific kind of childhood cancer and nearby oil and gas activity, but the state Health Department and others are challenging the conclusion.

Fracking Rule Text Disappears From Interior Department Website
EcoWatch | Alleen Brown

In Donald Trump’s first week as president, text describing two rules regulating the oil and gas industry was removed from an Interior Department website. The rules, limiting hydraulic fracturing and natural gas flaring on public lands, are in the crosshairs of the Trump administration. The changes were noted by the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative or EDGI, which has been monitoring changes to federal web sites since Trump’s inauguration.

Full Article

CA Oil & Gas Press Clips: 2/15/17

CA Oil & Gas Press Clips
Wednesday, February 15, 2017

TOP STORY

  • Hundreds of oilfield wastewater wells across California must shut down Wednesday, after a federal audit found the state illegally allowed oil companies to inject contaminated fluids into protected water supplies. But that’s not stopping the state from backing yet another oil company’s request to inject wastewater into a protected underground water source in the Bay Area. (CBS, Environmental Leader, Center for Biological Diversity)

CALIFORNIA

California Illegally Allowed Oil Companies To Inject Wastewater In Protected Waters, Audit Finds
CBS | Christin Ayers

Hundreds of oilfield wastewater wells across California must shut down Wednesday, after a federal audit found the state illegally allowed oil companies to inject contaminated fluids into protected water supplies. But that’s not stopping the state from backing yet another oil company’s request to inject wastewater into a protected underground water source in the Bay Area.

Federal Audit Forces California Drillers to Halt Production
Environmental Leader | Ken Silverstein

A federal audit is forcing hundreds of oilfield wastewater wells throughout California to shutdown. It revealed that the state had “illegally” permitted those companies to inject contaminated fluids into protected waters supplies, writes the CBS affiliate, KPIX 5. The station writes that local officials had cited E&B Natural Resources for “failure to provide an immediate verbal report” of the contamination. It also says that in a separate incident E&B was sued for improper transportation and disposal of hazardous waste.

Trump Administration Waives Water-Protection Rule for Three California Oilfields
Indy Bay Media

The Trump administration this week granted requests from Gov. Jerry Brown’s regulators to exempt three aquifers near the Fruitvale, Round Mountain and Tejon oilfields in California’s Kern County from the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. Approval of these “aquifer exemption” applications by the Environmental Protection Agency gives oil companies permission to dump contaminated waste fluid into these underground water supplies.

Oil Wells Are Bad Neighbors to These Kids in LA
EcoWatch | Jordan Simmons

Hear from the kids of Wilmington, California, who grow up in the shadow of oil wells. This video, second in the series of Stop Fooling California, tells the story of urban oil extraction in Los Angeles.

Refinery problems keep impacting Vallejo, state gas prices
Vallejo Times-Herald | Rachel Raskin-Zrihen

A AAA spokesman blames the higher cost of gas statewide at least in part on California’s refineries’ continuing production problems, “which led to the third consecutive week of production declines in the region, all of which kept California’s gas prices near the top of the country.”

LA leader fights to boost Porter Ranch health study, says gas leak settlement ‘ignores’ community
Los Angeles Daily News | Gregory Wilcox

Los Angeles City Councilman Mitchell Englander on Tuesday demanded that air quality regulars increase the amount of money for a health study included in the $8.5 million settlement of a lawsuit filed against Southern California Gas Co. over a massive methane leak at its Aliso Canyon storage facility above Porter Ranch.

Councilman Englander wants proceeds from SoCalGas settlement to help Aliso gas leak families
My News LA | Debbie Sklar

City Councilman Mitchell Englander said Tuesday he wants the South Coast Air Quality Management District to utilize proceeds from its $8.5 million settlement agreement with the Southern California Gas Company stemming from the Aliso Canyon gas leak to benefit the communities impacted by it. Englander said he plans to submit a resolution at Tuesday’s City Council meeting asking the council and Mayor Eric Garcetti to support the idea.

Breathless in Bakersfield: is the worst air pollution in the US about to get worse?
The Guardian | Nate Berg

Though some improvements have been made in recent years through more stringent air quality standards, cleaner burning engines and efficient industrial machinery, the Bakersfield region continues to struggle with poor air quality and the health problems it brings. Now the election of Donald Trump to the presidency, and his appointment of an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) head in Scott Pruitt who is actively opposed air quality regulations, has many worried that the small but steady improvements to the area’s air quality may all be undone.

OPINION, REPORT, & PRESS RELEASE

Trump Administration Waives Water-protection Rule for Three California Oilfields
Center for Biological Diversity 

The Trump administration this week granted requests from Gov. Jerry Brown’s regulators to exempt three aquifers near the Fruitvale, Round Mountain and Tejon oilfields in California’s Kern County from the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. Approval of these “aquifer exemption” applications by Trump’s Environmental Protection Agency gives oil companies permission to dump contaminated waste fluid into these underground water supplies.

County supervisors should vote yes on plan to study community choice aggregation
San Diego Union-Tribune | Bruce Bekkar and Donald Mosier

This Wednesday Feb. 15, our County Board of Supervisors will vote on whether to authorize a feasibility study recommended by staff on Community Choice Aggregation (CCA). An increasingly popular option throughout California, CCAs (also known as CCEs) provide local residents an alternative to investor-owned utilities and a chance to select a mix of less carbon-intensive electricity at competitive prices. A San Diego County CCA program would be a big step towards a cleaner, healthier future for everyone.

NATIONAL

The United States of oil and gas
The Washington Post | Tim Meko and Laris Karklis

Since 2010, the United States has been in an oil-and-gas boom. In 2015, domestic production was at near-record levels, and we now produce more petroleum products than any other country in the world. President Trump said he plans to double down on the oil and gas industry, lifting regulations and drilling on federal land. Here is the state of the petroleum extraction industry that the energy secretary nominee, Rick Perry, would inherit.

Shake Rattle & Roll: The Rise of Man-Made Earthquakes
Boston University News | Olivia Trani

On September 3rd, 2016, the earth beneath Pawnee, Oklahoma, shook. A large earthquake hit the town, damaging several buildings and injuring a few residents. Seismologists from the United State Geological Survey scaled it as a magnitude 5.8 quake, the strongest seismic event recorded in the state’s history. To out of state observers, this quake may seem surprising. But to Oklahomans, earthquakes like this one have become the new norm.

EPA Veterans Mobilize to Defend Agency’s Work, Bracing for Trump’s Impact
Inside Climate News | Neela Bannerjee

Retired and former employees of the Environmental Protection Agency are banding together in rare activism to defend colleagues still working for the agency, as fears of deep layoffs, regulatory rollbacks and science suppression spread through the federal ranks. Though organizing is still in its early stages, they’re holding protest rallies, looking to nurture agency whistleblowers and pushing senators to vote against President Donald Trump’s EPA administrator nominee, Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt.

The West’s coal giant is closing way ahead of schedule
Grist | Jonathan Thompson

The smokestacks of the Navajo Generating Station rise 775 feet from the sere landscape of the Navajo Nation in northern Arizona. On Monday, the plant’s four private utility owners, led by the Salt River Project, voted to shut down the plant at the end of 2019, some 25 years ahead of schedule. When the giant turbines come to a halt and the towers topple in the coming years, the plant will become a new symbol, this one of a transforming energy economy and an evolving electrical grid that is slowly rendering these soot-stained, mechanical megaliths obsolete.

($) denotes a paid subscription is required to view this article. 

Full Article

CA Oil & Gas Press Clips: February 14, 2017

CA Oil & Gas Press Clips
Tuesday, February 14, 2017

TOP STORY

  • It’s now a waiting game as California regulators decide whether to reopen the Aliso Canyon natural gas storage facility in Los Angeles County, the site of an October 2015 blowout that released an estimated 97,000 metric tons of methane over four months. Activists say nothing short of a permanent shutdown is acceptable. And they say SoCalGas has been manufacturing a fake shortage crisis to influence regulators and the governor to allow the facility to open as soon as possible. (Truth Out)

CALIFORNIA 

State Lands Commissioners Express Disapproval of Venoco Lease Boundary Adjustment
NoozHawk | Sam Goldman

Venoco Inc.’s lease-line adjustment proposal may not go before the State Lands Commission until summer at the earliest, but commissioners have implied that the project is already dead in the water. As part of the proposed adjustment, the oil company would return 3,800 acres of its lease — including all of the near-shore area off Goleta — to the state of California in exchange for 3,400 new acres east of its current boundary.

Gasoline prices creeping back up
San-Diego Union Tribune | Rob Nikolewski

If you get the feeling you’re paying a little bit more for gasoline lately, you’re right. The average price of a gallon of regular-grade gasoline in California has gone up 20 cents, or 7.5 percent, since the end of November. That’s slightly higher than the national average, which has gone up 7.1 percent since Nov. 30.

California Residents and Lawmakers Fight Reopening of Aliso Canyon, Site of Huge Natural Gas Blowout
Truth-Out | Larry Buhl

It’s now a waiting game as California regulators decide whether to reopen the Aliso Canyon natural gas storage facility in Los Angeles County, the site of an October 2015 blowout that released an estimated 97,000 metric tons of methane over four months. Activists say nothing short of a permanent shutdown is acceptable. And they say SoCalGas has been manufacturing a fake shortage crisis to influence regulators and the governor to allow the facility to open as soon as possible.

Auto executives want Trump to roll back clean-air standards. Can California stand in their way?
Los Angeles Times | Michael Hiltzik

Sensing a kindred spirit in the White House, the auto industry is pressuring President Trump to roll back vehicle efficiency standards, which they imply are too stringent and could cost America jobs. That’s the burden of a letter that went out last week to Trump from the heads of 18 auto manufacturers, including General Motors, Ford and Fiat Chrysler. They asked him to reverse a ruling issued by the Environmental Protection Agency just before his inauguration that locked down fuel efficiency rules through 2025.

Dakota pipeline protesters persuade CalPERS to reconsider project
Sacramento Bee | Adam Ashton

After hearing sometimes tearful testimony from environmentalists and Native Americans, the CalPERS Board of Directors indicated on Monday that it would consider divesting from the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline project.

Dakota Access Pipeline Opponents Call on CalPERS to Divest
East Bay Express | Darwin BondGraham

In response to President Donald Trump’s decision to expedite construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, opponents of the controversial project are redoubling their efforts to block it. One strategy is to defund it. Today in Sacramento, more than one hundred people crowded into the board meeting of the nation’s largest public pension fund calling for divestment from the companies building the DAPL.

California Dam Crisis Leaves Power Market Short of Big Hydro
Bloomberg | Ryan Collins

As state officials rush to repair an emergency spillway for the Oroville dam — just 150 miles (241 kilometers) north of San Francisco — an 819-megawatt hydropower plant, capable of supplying about 600,000 homes with electricity, remains shut there. That’s the equivalent of two natural gas-fired power plants that will need to kick into gear elsewhere in California to make up for the lost supplies, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

Broken California Dam is a Sign of Emergencies to Come
Scientific American | Anne C. Mulkern

The situation at Oroville — in Butte County, Calif., northeast of Sacramento — happened after both an infrastructure failure and a weather event, said Daniel Swain, a climate scientist with UCLA. A series of storms powered by a phenomenon known as the atmospheric river hit Northern California this winter. Those filled Oroville, prompting the release of water onto its spillway. Then that structure suffered a sinkhole that became apparent last week.

Environmental groups predicted Oroville emergency spillway erosion in 2005 court document
Los Angeles Times | Joseph Serna

Erosion near an Oroville reservoir emergency spillway was first predicted in court documents filed by environmentalists more than a decade ago. In a technical memo on Lake Oroville’s discharge, the Yuba County Water Agency wrote in 2002 that if the Department of Water Resources used the emergency spillway, “extensive erosion would take place” and that “the spillway road and possibly high voltage transmission towers would be impacted,” according to a motion to intervene on the licensing filed by environmentalist groups in 2005.

OPINION, REPORT, & PRESS RELEASE

A missing Black political conversation on climate change
Pittsburgh Courier | Charles D. Ellison

Overall — outside of occasional shout-outs to Flint — there are few signs that Black elected officials, policymakers and political operatives are making a concerted effort on issues related to the environment, whether it’s water quality, clean air, urban resilience or climate change.

From California, a Progressive Cry for State’s Rights
New Republic | Daniela Blei

Donald Trump hadn’t even been sworn in as president before California was declared, in the words of The New York Times, “the vanguard of the resistance.” With a Democratic supermajority, the country’s largest immigrant population, and Governor Jerry Brown’s landmark policies on climate change, the state was gearing up for battle against the Trump administration. To that end, the California legislature hired Eric Holder, an attorney general under President Barack Obama, to represent the state in legal fights to come.

NATIONAL

Climate Disobedience in the Time of Trump
The Nation | Wen Stephenson

Ken Ward and Emily Johnston are willing to spend decades in prison for shutting down tar-sands oil pipelines. They want you to understand why.

Vancouver oil terminal seeks support from Tri-Cities
Tri-City Herald | Wendy Culverwell

An oil industry executive called on Pasco on Monday to build political support for a $210 million oil-by-rail terminal in Vancouver. Tesoro, the West Coast’s largest seller of transportation fuels, and its partner, Savage Energy, want to convert an existing dock at the Port of Vancouver into an oil terminal to handle up to 360,000 barrels of crude per day.

Future Fears of American Indians
Study Break | Galen Patterson

With several Native American tribes dependent on mining and welding to support their families, there are mixed reactions to the Trump presidency and the Dakota Access Pipeline.

($) denotes a paid subscription is required to view this article. 

Full Article

Fracking Press Clips: February 13, 2017

TOP STORY

  • Perhaps more than any other special interest, the oil industry has helped reshape California’s political landscape, in part by cultivating a relationship with Brown and nourishing a new breed of Democrats: moderate lawmakers who are casting a critical eye on the state’s suite of climate-change policies, including its signature cap-and-trade program. (The Center for Public Integrity)

 

CALIFORNIA 

Next Porter Ranch gas leak fight may be over money
Los Angeles Daily News | Greg Wilcox

The next big fight centering on the massive natural gas leak above Porter Ranch will likely be over money. Last week the Southern California Gas Co. announced it would pay $8.5 million to settle a lawsuit filed by air regulators. Now it looks to some, especially residents, that the community got short-changed.

Big Oil’s grip on California
The Center for Public Integrity | Michael J. Mishak

Known nationally as a laboratory of progressive values and environmental protection, California is perhaps the last place one would expect Big Oil to hold sway. Obscured by the headlines, however, is oil’s enduring power in the Golden State. Perhaps more than any other special interest, the oil industry has helped reshape California’s political landscape, in part by cultivating a relationship with Brown and nourishing a new breed of Democrats: moderate lawmakers who are casting a critical eye on the state’s suite of climate-change policies, including its signature cap-and-trade program, which aims to curb greenhouse gases by penalizing companies that pollute.

Fearing worse, oil industry fights to save cap and trade ($)
Climate Wire | Anne C. Mulkern

In the battle over whether to preserve California’s landmark climate change program, an unlikely defender has emerged: an influential trade group for the oil industry.

E-mails Suggest a Very Cozy Relationship Between California’s Oil Industry and the State’s Regulators
The Nation | Michael J. Mishak

As California regulators oversaw an oil boom, industry representatives lobbied to ease drilling rules and shape new regulations. Four years of e-mails obtained by the Center for Public Integrity suggest a comfortable—at times, chummy —relationship between Governor Jerry Brown’s appointees and the industry. Exchanging hundreds of notes, state officials at the California Department of Conservation and the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR) forwarded internal memos to trade groups, alerted oil companies of legislative inquires, and coordinated media responses with industry.

Regulators May Reopen Aliso Canyon Gas Field Over Residents’ Objections
KQED | Molly Peterson

About a year after plugging the largest methane leak in U.S. history, Southern California Gas Co. may once again start pumping natural gas into its Aliso Canyon storage field in Los Angeles County. State regulators are weighing whether to reopen the gas field over the objections of residents and politicians. “I think the wells are safe,” says Ken Harris, California’s Oil and Gas supervisor, one of two regulators making the decision. He says SoCalGas has replaced miles of pipeline at the field. Inspectors have cleared 37 out of 114 gas wells for operation so far and are still checking out the rest. And Harris says new rules would require more and better inspections.

 

OPINION, REPORT, & PRESS RELEASE

A Rare Republican Call to Climate Action
The New York Times | Editorial Board

The most important thing about a carbon tax plan proposed last week may be the people behind it: prominent Republicans like James Baker III, George Shultz and Henry Paulson Jr. Their endorsement of the idea, variations of which have been suggested before, may be a breakthrough for a party that has closed its eyes to the perils of man-made climate change and done everything in its power to thwart efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

 

NATIONAL

Lawmaker Says Colorado Attorney General Acting For Oil, Gas Industry
CBS Denver 

A Democratic state lawmaker on Friday accused Republican Attorney General Cynthia Coffman of acting “at the behest of oil and gas companies” when she threatened to sue Boulder County over its moratorium on oil and gas drilling.

Oil and gas discoveries dry up to lowest total for 60 years
Financial Times | Ed Crooks

Discoveries of new oil and gas fields have dropped to a fresh 60-year low, as companies put a brake on exploration and large fields have become harder to find. There were only 174 oil and gas discoveries worldwide last year, compared with an average of 400-500 a year up until 2013, according to IHS Markit, the research group.

U.S. Conservatives Unveil Plan to Fight Climate Change
National Geographic | Michael Greshko

In an effort to address the threat of climate change, a group of conservative U.S. statesmen has outlined a plan that, by 2030, could cut the United States’s carbon emissions by up to two-fifths below 2005 levels. At a Wednesday press conference, the newly established “Climate Leadership Council”— a consortium of Republican Party stalwarts including officials from the Reagan and both Bush administrations—unveiled their plan for a gradually increasing, revenue-neutral tax that puts a price on carbon dioxide emissions.

This Tax Could Save the Planet From Climate Change
Bloomeberg | Eric Roston

With help from figures from the Republican Party establishment, Ted Halstead staged what may be the biggest day for climate policy since the Paris Agreement was signed in 2015. Their much publicized meeting with Gary Cohn, President Donald Trump’s top economic adviser, helped introduce the Climate Leadership Council to a broader audience, and perhaps open a pathway to addressing global warming without compromising the party’s core beliefs.

($) denotes a paid subscription is required to view this article. 

Full Article

Fracking Press Clips: February 10, 2017

TOP STORY

  • A state Senate bill that would stop the reopening of the Aliso Canyon gas-storage facility until the root cause of the 2015 blowout at the facility is thoroughly investigated by state regulators has passed its first Legislative hurdle. (The Signal, Sacramento Bee)

 

CALIFORNIA 

State officials: Measure Z doesn’t stop state from allowing expansion of wastewater injection area
Monterey Herald | Claudia Melendez Salinas

A voter-approved measure to limit oil production in Monterey County does not keep the state from further considering allowing expansion of the boundaries of an aquifer where oil-production wastewater is being injected, according to a letter sent to Measure Z proponents. The letter was sent by the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources of the Department of Conservation in advance of a public hearing that took place Thursday in King City.

Bill to stop gas facility from reopening passes
The Signal Santa Clarita | Kevin Kenney

A state Senate bill that would stop the reopening of the Aliso Canyon gas-storage facility until the root cause of the 2015 blowout at the facility is thoroughly investigated by state regulators has passed its first Legislative hurdle. The Senate’s Natural Resources and Water Committee on Thursday voted 7-2 in favor of SB57, an urgency measure authored by Sen. Henry Stern and co-authored by Sen. Scott Wilk.

Utilities Commission Approves Aliso Canyon Investigation
KPBS

Pursuant to state law, the California Public Utilities Commission opened a two-phase investigation Thursday of whether use of the Aliso Canyon natural gas storage facility in Porter Ranch can be reduced or eliminated altogether. The CPUC approved the probe at its meeting in San Francisco. According to the commission, the first phase will involve a “thorough analysis” of whether the storage facility — site of a massive four-month gas leak that forced the temporary relocation of thousands of residents — can be taken out of use or reduced “while still maintaining electric and gas reliability for the region.”

SoCal Gas’ Settlement Over Aliso Canyon Methane Leak Includes Health Study
Inside Climate News | Zahra Hirji

Southern California Gas Co. has agreed to pay $8.5 million to settle a lawsuit with local air quality regulators over a massive methane leak at its Aliso Canyon natural gas storage facility in 2015. This includes $1 million to fund a three-part health study of the communities impacted by the gas leak.

Lawmakers seek to delay reopening of Aliso Canyon facility where methane leak occurred
The Sacramento Bee | Alexei Koseff

A year after the Southern California Gas Co. finally plugged the massive Aliso Canyon methane leak, a furious debate is brewing over whether to reopen the largest underground natural gas storage facility in the west.

Exxon Wants In On Calif. Coastal Fracking, Acidizing Suits
Law 360 | Adam Lidgett

Exxon Mobil Corp. sought Wednesday to intervene in two lawsuits challenging an environmental assessment by two U.S. Department of the Interior divisions that would allow acid well stimulation and fracking off Southern California’s coastline, saying the company has invested significant resources in exploration and development in the area.

 

NATIONAL

Wall Street’s love affair with energy heats up as rigs soar
Albuquerque Journal | David Wethe

Wall Street is throwing the most money at U.S. energy companies since at least 2000 amid growing confidence that the industry is emerging from the worst downturn in a generation. Energy firms raised $6.64 billion in 13 equity offerings in January, drawn in by a rich combination of oil prices consistently above $50 a barrel and a rush to drill that’s doubled the rigs in use in the U.S. and Canada since May. The biggest change from last year: oilfield servicers that provide the rigs, fracking equipment and sand used by drillers.

Trump: We spent $6T in Middle East and didn’t even get a ‘tiny oil well’
The Hill | Jordan Fabian

President Trump on Thursday doubled down on his comments the U.S. should have taken oil from the Middle East during its wars there. “We’ve spent $6 trillion … in the Middle East,” Trump said during a meeting with airline executives at the White House. “We’ve got nothing. We’ve got nothing. We never even kept a small, even a tiny oil well. Not one little oil well. I said, ‘Keep the oil.’”

($) denotes a paid subscription is required to view this article. 

Full Article

Fracking Press Clips: February 9, 2017

TOP STORY

  • SoCal Gas reached an $8.5 million settlement with the South Coast Air Quality Management District Wednesday over the massive Aliso Canyon storage facility gas leak. A portion of the money will also be used for an independent health study that will be conducted on potential health impacts from the leak. (CBS, ABC, Associated Press)

 

CALIFORNIA 

Utility to Pay $8.5 Million to Settle Suit Over Gas Blowout
Associated Press

The Southern California Gas Co. agreed Wednesday to pay $8.5 million to settle a lawsuit over a well blowout that spewed natural gas for nearly four months and drove thousands of residents from their Los Angeles homes. The utility signed an agreement with the South Coast Air Quality Management District to fund a study about health impacts from the leak, which San Fernando Valley residents have blamed for headaches, nausea, nosebleeds, rashes and other ailments.

SoCal Gas Reaches $8.5 million settlement with SCAQMD over Porter Ranch Leak
ABC 7

The Southern California Gas Company reached an $8.5 million settlement with the South Coast Air Quality Management District Wednesday over the massive Aliso Canyon storage facility gas leak. A portion of the money ($1 million) will also be used for an independent health study that will be conducted on potential health impacts from the 2016 gas leak.

 

OPINION, REPORT, & PRESS RELEASE

Kudos To Colorado AG For Rebuking Boulder County On Its Fracking Moratorium
Forbes | Cory L. Andrews

A number of Colorado localities, including Longmont and Fort Collins, delighted radical environmental activists by restricting or banning oil and gas extraction despite the huge economic benefits such activities have generated in Colorado. Opponents of local oil and gas regulation have correctly argued that city or county ordinances create an inefficient patchwork of rules that increases costs and deters development.

 

NATIONAL

Renewable Energy Continues to Beat Fossil Fuels
Time | Justin Worland

Clean energy grew at a record pace as the United States added 22GW of capacity — the equivalent of 11 Hoover Dams — to the grid from renewable sources last year, significantly trumping new fossil fuel additions, according to a new report. The report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) and the Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE) cites the declining cost of wind and solar power, largely due to advances in technology, as prime reasons for the rapid adoption of renewables.

North Dakota tribe says running out of options to stop pipeline
Reuters | Ernest Scheyder and Terray Sylvester

The leader of a Native American tribe attempting to block the Dakota Access oil pipeline said on Wednesday the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe may have exhausted legal options to stop the project after the company building it won federal permission to tunnel under the Missouri River.

Former interior secretary Jewell says Army is ‘reneging’ on its commitments on Dakota Access pipeline
The Washington Post | Juliet Eilperin

Former interior secretary Sally Jewell said in an interview Wednesday that the Army Corps of Engineers was “reneging” on its commitment to other federal agencies and tribal leaders to conduct a thorough environmental review of the Dakota Access pipeline before granting an easement to the project’s sponsor.

Bill to ban fracking to be introduced in Maryland
Associated Press

A measure to ban hydraulic fracturing for natural gas in Maryland is being introduced. Del. David Fraser-Hidalgo is expected to introduce the measure on Thursday with more than 50 co-sponsors. Proponents say fracking will create jobs, but opponents say the pollution risks are too great.

Appeals court breathes new life into $30 million fracking lawsuit against Dallas
The Dallas Morning News | Robert Wilonsky

When your city’s dueling financial perils number in the with-a-B billions, it’s easy to shrug off or forget those threats that are just — just, hah — in the tens of millions. But with all this anguishing over a fast-failing police and fire pension fund, and with a trial looming in the near-horizon over a decades-old public safety workers’ pay referendum, here’s a grim reminder, courtesy of an appeals court’s freshly minted ruling: Dallas could still be on the hook for around $30 million in long-expired gas-drilling leases.

($) denotes a paid subscription is required to view this article. 

Full Article




« Previous Next »